MAKE A DONATION

give_4.jpg

BECOME A MEMBER

join_3.jpg

RECEIVE ENEWS

connect_2.jpg

Art in the Garden

As you stroll through the Kruckeberg Botanic Garden, you may encounter pieces of art.  Some were placed years ago by Art and Mareen. Others have been placed more recently as part of the City of Shoreline sculpture stroll or local student art projects. We are proud that these pieces can call KBG home!

Professional Art in the Garden

Permanent Collection

These works are permanently on display at KBG and are not for sale.

Wood Wave, by Bruce Johnson

The most significant piece of art in KBG, Wood Wave was placed into the garden in September 2013. Wood Wave is a contemporary piece by California artist Bruce Johnson made from a 1,000-year-old redwood root system.  This visually complex and stunning piece is also monumental in size, weighing over four tons and measuring 8x12x10 feet. Wood Wave is the largest donation of art in the history of Shoreline, both in terms of size and value ($50,000).

What makes it so special is that the intricacies of the piece can be explored up close; the sculpture is designed to be touched, interacted with, and even climbed upon.

Temporary Work - Shoreline Sculpture Stroll

These works are for sale. For more information about purchasing these sculptures, please contact Ros Bird, Shoreline Arts Coordinator at 206-801-2661.

 Red Glow Red Glow by Jeff Tangen
 The Skater The Skater by Kevin Au
 Surfbirds Surf Birds by Tony Angell

Student Art in the Garden

We are pleased to welcome a diverse selection of rotating student art in the Garden. For 2014, we have pieces from Seattle Pacific University art students as well as Garden of Creativity Camp for middle schoolers. 

Seattle Pacific University - Public Sculpture Course taught by Roger Feldman

These pieces were installed in 2014. Their goal was to create a piece of art for a public space that also provided habitat for wildlife.

DSC 0760

Geometric

Bats

Provides aesthetic whimsy and bat house habitat.

Geometric 

Provides habitat for insects

Forest Spirits Jars

Forest Spirits

Provides habitat for garden spiders

Hanging Jars

Provides habitat for Mason Bees


DSC 0744

Woman

 

Women 

Provides habitat for plants and small mammals as the pieces decompose

 

Garden of Creativity Summer Camp - taught by Undine Brod and Jodi Waltier

An art camp for middle school students. The students were given one week to create a masterpiece with the materials provided to them. Materials were generously donated by teaching artists, KBGF community members and the Creation Station.DSC 0418

 Kai Brook  Alwyn
 Kai Brook  Alwyn Taylor Goodnight
 Marieke  Kasey
 Marieke Visscher  Kasey Carr
 Sebastian  Jade
 Sebastian Koziol  Jade Ramsay
 Anna Jackels  Artemis
 Anna Jackels  Artemis Hamilton-Eppler
 Stuart  Nick
 Stuart Kuehne  Nicholas Muth

 

Garden of Creativity Summer Camp - taught by Darwin Nordin and Marita Dingus

An art camp for middle school students. The students were given one week to create a masterpiece with the materials provided to them. Materials were generously donated by teaching artists, KBGF community members and the Creation Station.

 faces   week2
 Cindy Yang  Mikayla Friend
 DSC 0753  artweek2
 Tristan Threadgill  Olivia Finney
 trumpetpiece  Tabitha
 Brooks Wilson  Tabitha Wagner
 Dress  Tabitha
Kyra Kruse Malulea Malgapo
staircase   
 Jean Schuler  

North Seattle Community College - 3D Sculpture Course taught by Lynn Hull

In 2013, we welcomed instructor Lynne Hull from North Seattle Community College and students from her 3D sculpture class. Of the 20 students in her class, 5 were selected to be installed at KBG. Read more about the evaluation process here. Of the pieces installed in June 2013, we retained one piece for permanent display.

Kira Fitzpatrick

Human, Nature by Kira Fitzpatrick

Installed June 2013 

Through my artistic education I have been learning a skill many of us are no longer taught — how to work with my hands. This process of using materials to relay an idea has led me to think about the connection between nature and the everyday aspects of human life. Although our dinner tables may be made of wood, we are removed from the experience of the wood before it was a table. This table, set with a simple plate, cup, and bowl also calls to mind our connection to food, from which we are increasingly withdrawn due to industrial agriculture, processed foods, and supermarkets. By taking mundane human objects and returning them to their natural origins, this work calls attention to this tenuous connection. As the sculpture ages and the moss continues to grow, eventually decomposing and returning earth to earth, it will continue to illustrate humanity's changing relationship with nature.